Tag Archives: #ictedu

ESports Classes & Game Ratings

Recently, a Norwegian school announced plans to add eSports class in replacement of a physical education class. An eSports class allows for all students who take this class to be on an equal skill level no matter physical abilities, in particular for students who may be physically disabled. The eSports class plan is to have 15 gaming pcs which a class of about 30 students; this way students are playing online or they are doing physical exercises to improve eSports skills. An essential part of a physical education class is teamwork and communication, which through the years of eSports has proven to be the greatest skill needed to be a successful eSports team as you need to communicate with teammates on strategy and problem solving so you and your teammates can achieve your goals as a team. Many of titles of the class include League of Legends, Counter-Strike: Global Offensive, and DOTA 2; all online video games which require constant communication to be successful. The pilot class will not begin until the 2016/2017 academic year at Garnes high school in Norway.

eSports are competitive video game tournaments and are often broadcast live on the internet and with a live audience. These video games, like League of Legends, Counter-Strike: Global-Offensive, and DOTA 2 are usually team based and require teams of five players. The larger tournaments held have sponsored such as Razer, Mad Catz, BENQ and other technology or beverage companies. For major league teams, these tournaments can be a great source of income from the prize money; the International League of Legends tournament in 2015 had a prize pool of $2,130,000 USD with first prize winning $1,000,000 USD.

With the potential introduction of this class into mainstream school, eSports may quickly become a modern class. With the primary focus being secondary schools, it seems appropriate that the games selected for the course are intended for a more mature audience, but what about games that are for players age 18 and older? Games such as Counter Strike: Global Offensive are rated ages 18+ on both the PEGI and ESRB rating board, and most students in a high school setting are anywhere between 14 & 18 years of age. As the class will be a pilot this 2016/2017 academic year, there has yet to be any information on if there is a given age limit or prerequisite to the class.

With the ratings of games, which are enforced so players, and more importantly, parents know what the game contains with just a look at a label. It will be vital to the class on how they will work with these ratings. One possible solution is that the class only select games in which the PEGI and ESRB rating are appropriate, that way students are playing the appropriate games suited to their age bracket. Most games with a mature rating tend to be graphically violent with blood and gore, use of profane language, sexual and or drug use. Most of the games listed for the pilot eSports class, which is to be introduced in Garnes high school in Norway, are rated Teen for players age 13 and older except Counter-Strike: Global Offensive.

As an eSports class, I raise the question on if the students will be playing in a closed network, or if they will be playing against other users online? The pros to playing online would be very beneficial to the team building of the class once they have progressed through the course and have a good understanding of team communication and working together as a team. If the students remained within a closed network, it might become too repetitive to play against students in their class, which could plateau the students learning if a challenge is not presented. Playing against other players online would make them more adaptive when playing as a team. Occasionally, teams may have a joker in the pack which can cause trouble for their team, or be unpredictable for the other team. It would also be possible for students of the class to come across a team online, who may have developed more advanced strategies when it comes to these games; giving students a workout.

Possible issues that could arise for students in an online environment is cross-team communication. ESport games that are incredibly competitive often lead to intimidation or confrontation if a team or player don’t like another player. This confrontation can be either through text, actions in the game such as focusing on a particular character or out of game contact via game messaging systems or social media.

The presence of video games in the classroom has grown since I was in young, making my way to the computer lab to play Reader Rabbit for class. With games such as Minecraft being used in the classroom and displayed at ICTEDU and showing how it effectively promotes creativity with students. This technology could take a giant leap forward in the near future, depending on the success of the eSports pilot class in Garnes high school in Norway this upcoming academic year.

Find out more about ICTEDU by visiting ICTEDU’s websiteTwitterEventbrite or Facebook page.

Written By Cole Campbell, Creative Multimedia student at Limerick Institute of Technology Clonmel, along with his team Bilal Waraich and Ciara Doyle.

The Fear Of Losing What You Know

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The art of being a teacher is a lesson based on getting people to be capable of polar thinking. A feeling, a thought and a sense. Where in, you see those that are thought to be mutual opposites, the student and the teacher. Teachers learn to teach, to fill the students with knowledge they don’t have. The teacher is always right because of their status as an educator leaving the student to be always wrong in retrospect until they have learned what the teacher has taught. Normally we think the right and wrong are mutually exclusive but to those who are capable to polar thinking, they can see the two go together and not as mutually exclusive.

Let’s consider what is what is right in education. We have set a ridged foundation in how education is given to the youth. A foundation that is slowly deteriorating; ever so surely as the number of educators who use variances of technology in the class room grows. These are the educators who have allowed themselves to pause and take notice the serious strides in progress the youth have taken in today’s society in terms of equipping technology to be a part of their everyday lives. The children in our school stream today have learned to use technology in such an effortless manner, to take it away in the most important setting of their young lives is ridiculous.

On the 23rd of April the 12th annual ICTEDU conference held at LIT Thurles shall highlight this major issue.  Theme “Students as Co-Creators” is a collaboration between the student and teacher as a necessity. No special technology shall be featured at this conference, it is a showcase on how teachers have used technology during classes and what they found helped improve the learning experience for the student. A single day event not to be missed shall also hold workshops and talks by key note speakers; Barry Ryan (Biochemistry – DIT), Steve Wheeler (Educator, Author), Laura Howe (Educator, innovator of Older Voices Online) among many others.

Highlighting adaptions of technology into the classroom is the top priority of the conference and has been for many years. Technology being a medium between student and teacher means that the connection doesn’t stop at school hours.

Recently while at the gym between my own college workload I overheard two apparent 6th year student taking about an Art History essay on Michelangelo due the following day; one student complaining the essay would take ages to research and write. The other was more reassuring, referencing the shared google drive folder between the class and art department had all the required notes. This to me personally is amazing and I wonder how my own Art history essays would have gone had I had a direct link to both the teacher’s online sources and the 500 page book that never left my rucksack. Would I have learned more with two mediums? The answer is a resounding yes. Putting it very black and white; when a student unable to use one source (for lack of a better reason, the student is bored at staring at pages or the student is fed up staring at a screen) they given another, they get a mental “revamp” at their work. In short their work has a 50% more chance of reaching a higher grade mark.

To shy away from having a platform for your students to learn online is ludicrous, as we progress further into the 21rst century the use of online resources shall only grow. A lot has and can come from the written note; a form of cognitive learning, we are not trying to abolish the practical way of teaching, only improve it.

The World Wide Web is the single greatest database of knowledge, one you can’t afford to deprive your students of. Yes one could argue that a young child would rather watch a squirrel water skiing with the aid of a remote motor boat, but how is that any different from the child who would draw stick figures on the corner of their textbook pages and watch their little animation come to life.

It is learning to find the balance between the two, to know when one shall be more beneficial to the learning environment you the educator has devised.

The fact you have taken time out in your busy schedule to read this shows to yourself you are accepting of change.

Hope to see you at The ICTEDU.

List of Guest Speakers: http://www.lit.ie/Tipperary/Schools/Speakers/default.aspx

Registration: http://lit.ie/ictedu

Written by Stuart Mackey; Creative Multimedia Student, Linda Maxwell and Liam O’Reilly – Digital Animation Students currently attending Limerick School of Art and Design Clonmel.

Students Creating and Sharing with Teachers

When the 12th annual Information and Communication Technology in Education(ICTedu) Conference wraps up on Saturday, the 23rd of April 2016, teachers from across Ireland will remember it as the event where they learned from students who shared ways to create and collaborate. This year’s theme—“Students as Co-Creators”—puts students in the driving seat to run workshops for teachers.

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The Future of Technology in Education

The Future of Technology in Education

Gone are the days when our primary resource was the blackboard. Join the digital revolution. #CloudNotChalk #ICTEDU

What will the future hold for education and teaching? We are now at a point where students could attend a lecturer virtually via a VR (Virtual Reality) head set such as Oculus Rift, without ever attending classes physically. They could also use VR technology to “be” at the battle of Waterloo, rather than just read about it. This has the potential to completely change education.

As great as this sounds, something would be lost along the way. There is no substitute for face-to-face interaction, or the experience of being in a physical location with other people. Digital technology, no matter how good, cannot really substitute for hands on experience. I think teachers will always need to interact in a physical environment with students in some capacity. After all, science fiction has often postulated the idea of eating your meals in a pill form, but I cannot imagine anyone packing away their dinner plates any time soon.

By looking at the bigger picture of what technology can bring to our classrooms, and upgrading our thinking, we can become more open to embracing the new and exciting technologies that are widely available to us.

The call for presenters for this year’s ICT in Education conference is now open at bit.ly/icteducall.

For more on how ICT can help to improve the way you teach, or to join the digital revolution, come along to this year’s ICTEDU (ICT in Education) on Saturday the 23rd of April in Limerick Institute of Technology, Thurles. For more information see http://lit.ie/ictedu.

Written by Kevin Dwane, Digital Animation Student in Limerick Institute of Technology, Clonmel, helping to promote #ICTEDU during syndicated online conversations, along with his team Laura Pigott, Sean Jordan and Marta Casalini.

The Virtual Classroom

Learning with Technology

Gone are the days when our primary resource was the blackboard. Join the digital revolution. #CloudNotChalk #ICTEDU

Learning today is a far cry from the picture twenty years ago. Lecturers consisted of hand written notes on a blackboard, whiteboard or overheads. Students looked forward frantically transcribing the lecturer in illegible handwriting – perfect study material for adding to exam stress two days before the exam. With the addition of online notes, students can now better decipher these notes by combining their own with the lecturers, to produce a higher level of learning.

Communication between students and teachers was also far more formal in the past. The way in which teachers engage with students project work has also changed. Assignments no longer need to be physically delivered to teacher’s pigeonholes. Student’s located dozens of kilometres from the college can upload their assignments remotely 24/7. Teachers can see exactly when assignments were uploaded. They will know if it was submitted before or after the deadline. Students can include much more information surrounding their projects with their submission, plus a multitude of online resources to back up their work. This gives teachers a much clearer picture of the student’s thought process and work method.

The delivery of information is not the only thing that has changed about education. Digital technology has completely altered the student/teacher relationship. Students can now access teachers as never before, thanks to email and social media, which has its pros and cons. It enables teachers to answer queries and give feedback on the current state of assignments, but it can also blur the lines of appropriate student teacher interaction. As a consequence, teachers need to be much more aware of protocol when engaging with students, particularly during out of school hours, and so appropriate codes of conduct should be put in place to ensure the rules of engagement are clear.

The call for presenters for this year’s ICT in Education conference is now open at bit.ly/icteducall.

For more on how ICT can help to improve the way you teach, or to join the digital revolution, come along to this year’s ICTEDU (ICT in Education) on Saturday the 23rd of April in Limerick Institute of Technology, Thurles. For more information see http://lit.ie/ictedu.

Written by Kevin Dwane, Digital Animation Student in Limerick Institute of Technology, Clonmel, helping to promote #ICTEDU during syndicated online conversations, along with his team Laura Pigott, Sean Jordan and Marta Casalini.

From clouds of chalk dust, to cloud computing

Technology in the Classroom

Gone are the days when our primary resource was the blackboard. Join the digital revolution. #CloudNotChalk #ICTEDU

It was not too long ago that a teacher’s primary resources were the book and the blackboard. Students would sit while teachers imparted wisdom, scribed in chalk onto the all-conquering slate. When the board was full, all that information would disappear into a cloud of chalk dust, which benefited everyone’s lungs. If you were really lucky you might watch a video that was often older than the teacher who was letting you take a break from your normal studies. Those days are long gone. Learning has entered the digital revolution. Tablets, desktops and laptops have replaced books. Digital projectors have replaced black boards. The World Wide Web is the new school library. Everyone can now breathe easier (pun intended) that the internet is speeding through the school corridors.

The digital revolution is changing the way we live and learn in the 21st century as much as the industrial revolution changed lives in the 18th century. Oceans of information have flooded the classroom thanks to the internet. However, is all this unfettered unlimited information a good thing? In the past, teachers only had access to books and journals through the library or by mail order. It was cumbersome and slow, but students had time to digest what they learned.

Now teachers can project pre-prepared lessons onto a white board, sprinkled with the latest video links. This allows for a much more immersive and interactive experience for all concerned. Pressure is taken off the teachers, as they can generate materials that can be reused again and again. It also gives students a much more enriching experience. Educators can now focus more on educating, than writing the lesson content on the board during class time. Students in turn can access the lecturer’s notes and video links online at a time of their choosing. They need no longer concern themselves with excessive note taking while simultaneously trying to listen during lectures, as they are now free to take shorter notes, or even doodle the content that is being explained to them, to hep accommodate a diverse range of learning styles across the student population. This takes the stress off both students and teachers.

The call for presenters for this year’s ICT in Education conference is now open at bit.ly/icteducall.

For more on how ICT can help to improve the way you teach, come along to this year’s ICTEDU (ICT in Education) on Saturday the 23rd of April in Limerick Institute of Technology, Thurles. For more information see http://lit.ie/ictedu.

Written by Kevin Dwane, Digital Animation Student in Limerick Institute of Technology, Clonmel, helping to promote #ICTEDU during syndicated online conversations, along with his team Laura Pigott, Sean Jordan and Marta Casalini.

Interview with Maria Hinfelaar

As part of the Youth Media Team (#YMT) at the ICT in Education Conferance at LIT today we interviewed Maria Hinfelaar (Presidant of LIT since 2004). She gave us her opinions on teachers in schools using technology such as email and Facebook to communicate with students and improve teaching in general. She also listed the technology she uses herself in daily life. http://audioboo.fm/boos/1385663-interview-with-maria-hinfelaar-ictedu

Youth Media Team

Eadaoin & Sean